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3 Myths and Facts About The Flipped Classroom in EMS Education

by  Public Safety Group     Sep 29, 2021
PSG_Myths_Facts_1200x628

Curious about the EMS flipped classroom, but unsure if it is right for your course? We’re uncovering three common misconceptions to ensure you have the information you need. 

The flipped classroom in EMS education is the pedagogical approach to teaching and learning wherein traditional instructor-centered classrooms transform into student centered learning environments. By now, you are likely familiar with the EMS flipped classroom; however, if this concept is new to you, be sure to check out a more in-depth analysis here. The flipped classroom is becoming more popular in EMS education, yet despite this popularity, the flipped classroom has many common misconceptions that may deter instructors from exploring its benefits for their courses. To help you further understand the EMS flipped classroom and if it is right for your course, we’ve put together a list of common myths and facts: 

Myth #1: This one-size approach won’t work for my course.

Fact: The flipped classroom model does not replace the highly personalized approach to teaching that you are accustomed to. It simply shifts the physical location of where students are learning foundational knowledge (outside the classroom) and where they are putting that knowledge into practice and ensuring they comprehend the material (in the classroom). Your course is still your course. In fact, by devoting the face-to-face component of your course to problem-solving activities and discussion, you’ll be able to focus on elevating your students’ knowledge and skills application to ensure they are ready for the field.

Myth #2: I don’t have the time to flip my classroom.

Fact: While it is true that EMS educators are already strapped for time, flipping your classroom is achievable. The idea of incorporating scenarios or introducing a new activity likely seems impossible, and it will be if you are still trying to run a traditional classroom; there simply isn’t enough class time to complete a lecture, oversee engaging activities, and provide space for discussion. However, when the instructor truly flips the classroom, students engage with primary source content before they arrive to class; therefore, face-to-face time is allotted for effective in-person collaboration, coaching, and problem solving. While there will be some additional time needed on your part when transitioning to the flipped model, in the long run you’ll be able to trim course hours and save time by utilizing the same piece of content, scenario, or activity multiple times. 

Myth #3: I’m not technologically savvy so the flipped model won’t work for me. 

Fact: Many EMS educators have been incorporating aspects of hybrid learning in their courses for years. With this experience, the transition to the flipped classroom model will be a shift in methodology, not technology. That said, putting the theory of the flipped classroom into practice can still feel overwhelming. Luckily, there are many resources available to make the transition to flipping your classroom easy. For example, the EMT Flipped Classroom and Paramedic Flipped Classroom from the Public Safety Group each serve as a flipped classroom course roadmap providing primary source content (textbook, eBook, virtual lectures) and all of the problem-solving activities, peer-to-peer activities, and materials you need to make the switch.

To learn more about the flipped classroom in EMS and common misconceptions, check out this helpful video from Heather Davis, EdD, and co-author of the EMT Flipped Classroom:




For a first-hand account of how the flipped classroom improves EMS course outcomes, check out this interview with EMS Program Director, Malinda Whipple.

For more information on how to "flip" your classroom, please contact your dedicated Public Safety Specialist or request a demo of the EMT Flipped Classroom or Paramedic Flipped Classroom today.

 


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3 Myths and Facts About The Flipped Classroom in EMS Education

by  Public Safety Group     Sep 29, 2021
PSG_Myths_Facts_1200x628

Curious about the EMS flipped classroom, but unsure if it is right for your course? We’re uncovering three common misconceptions to ensure you have the information you need. 

The flipped classroom in EMS education is the pedagogical approach to teaching and learning wherein traditional instructor-centered classrooms transform into student centered learning environments. By now, you are likely familiar with the EMS flipped classroom; however, if this concept is new to you, be sure to check out a more in-depth analysis here. The flipped classroom is becoming more popular in EMS education, yet despite this popularity, the flipped classroom has many common misconceptions that may deter instructors from exploring its benefits for their courses. To help you further understand the EMS flipped classroom and if it is right for your course, we’ve put together a list of common myths and facts: 

Myth #1: This one-size approach won’t work for my course.

Fact: The flipped classroom model does not replace the highly personalized approach to teaching that you are accustomed to. It simply shifts the physical location of where students are learning foundational knowledge (outside the classroom) and where they are putting that knowledge into practice and ensuring they comprehend the material (in the classroom). Your course is still your course. In fact, by devoting the face-to-face component of your course to problem-solving activities and discussion, you’ll be able to focus on elevating your students’ knowledge and skills application to ensure they are ready for the field.

Myth #2: I don’t have the time to flip my classroom.

Fact: While it is true that EMS educators are already strapped for time, flipping your classroom is achievable. The idea of incorporating scenarios or introducing a new activity likely seems impossible, and it will be if you are still trying to run a traditional classroom; there simply isn’t enough class time to complete a lecture, oversee engaging activities, and provide space for discussion. However, when the instructor truly flips the classroom, students engage with primary source content before they arrive to class; therefore, face-to-face time is allotted for effective in-person collaboration, coaching, and problem solving. While there will be some additional time needed on your part when transitioning to the flipped model, in the long run you’ll be able to trim course hours and save time by utilizing the same piece of content, scenario, or activity multiple times. 

Myth #3: I’m not technologically savvy so the flipped model won’t work for me. 

Fact: Many EMS educators have been incorporating aspects of hybrid learning in their courses for years. With this experience, the transition to the flipped classroom model will be a shift in methodology, not technology. That said, putting the theory of the flipped classroom into practice can still feel overwhelming. Luckily, there are many resources available to make the transition to flipping your classroom easy. For example, the EMT Flipped Classroom and Paramedic Flipped Classroom from the Public Safety Group each serve as a flipped classroom course roadmap providing primary source content (textbook, eBook, virtual lectures) and all of the problem-solving activities, peer-to-peer activities, and materials you need to make the switch.

To learn more about the flipped classroom in EMS and common misconceptions, check out this helpful video from Heather Davis, EdD, and co-author of the EMT Flipped Classroom:




For a first-hand account of how the flipped classroom improves EMS course outcomes, check out this interview with EMS Program Director, Malinda Whipple.

For more information on how to "flip" your classroom, please contact your dedicated Public Safety Specialist or request a demo of the EMT Flipped Classroom or Paramedic Flipped Classroom today.

 


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